• Blockchain could assign a digital certificate to each new interaction (e.g. manufacturing steps) with a food product, and store the entire record in a secure manner.
  • A POSTnote on this topic would look at the pros and cons of such approaches.
  • Provisional start date September 2019: To contribute expertise, literature or an external reviewer please email Dr Peter Border

Claims made for food products are not easy to verify and have to be taken on trust by the consumer. Recent years have seen significant improvements in the traceability of the food supply chain a trend which is likely to be accelerated in the coming years with the advent of blockchain technology.

Blockchain was originally developed as a decentralised ledger that records financial transactions and stores this information on a network in a manner which prevents it being changed at a future point. Applying this technology to the food supply chain involves assigning a digital certificate to each new interaction (a manufacturing step, a change in location or a change in storage conditions) with a food product, and storing the entire record in a secure manner.

A POSTnote on this subject could look at the potential pros and cons of applying blockchain technology to the food supply chain for consumers, manufacturers and retailers.