Documents to download

Where relevant this list will inform the deliberations of the POST Board on POST’s future work programme until it is updated or replaced by future horizon scanning activities. This list of issues was initially identified from academic papers and grey literature as having an impact on public policy, and then peer reviewed to focus on those topic areas of most interest, and then narrowed to those considered to be the highest priority through a workshop with parliamentary staff.

Acknowledgements

POSTbriefs are based on mini literature reviews and are externally peer reviewed. POST would like to thank peer reviewers for kindly giving up their time during the preparation of this briefing, including:

  • British Psychological Society
  • College of Policing
  • Education Endowment Foundation
  • Economic and Social Research Council
  • Joseph Rowntree Foundation
  • Making Every Adult Matter (MEAM)
  • Nuffield Foundation
  • Professor Paul Bywaters, Professor of Social Work, Coventry University
  • Science and Technology Facilities Council
  • Wellcome Trust
  • Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority
  • Nuffield Council on Bioethics
  • Professor Dan Osborn, Department of Earth Sciences, University College London
  • Professor Jim Watson, UK Energy Research Centre
  • Natural Environment Research Council
  • Professor Simon Blackmore, Harper Adams University
  • Professor Stuart Rogers, CEFAS
  • Professor Alan Stevens, TRL
  • Professor Nick Jennings, Imperial College London
  • Andrew Everett, A&E ltd
  • Becky LeAnstey, Horizon Scanning, Environment Agency
  • Professor Carol Phillips, The Institute of Food Science and Technology
  • The Institution of Engineering and Technology

Documents to download

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