Documents to download

In 2015, the Government committed 5 years of extra funding for Children and Young People’s Mental Health Services (CYPMHS). All areas of England were required to submit plans outlining how they will improve their services by 2020. This POSTnote describes some of the new models of CYPMHS and examines the challenges to their effective implementation.

Acknowledgements
POSTnotes are based on literature reviews and interviews with
a range of stakeholders and are externally peer reviewed.
POST would like to thank interviewees and peer reviewers
for kindly giving up their time during the preparation of this briefing
including:
Polly Ashmore, NHS England
Nigel Atter, British Psychological Society
Andy Bell, Centre for Mental Health
Elaine Bousfield, Xenzone
Dr Marc Bush, YoungMinds
Sinem Cakir, MAC-UK
Emily Frith, Education Policy Institute
Professor Peter Fonagy, UCL, Anna Freud National Centre
for Children and Families.
James Kenrick, Youth Access
Paula Lavis, Children and Young People’s Mental Health Coalition
David Lockwood, NHS England
Emma Louisy, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation
Anna Moore, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation
Lisa Nolan, Liverpool CCG
Fiona Pienaar, Place2Be
Tom Powell, House of Commons Library
Kathryn Pugh, NHS England


Documents to download

Related posts

  • Assisted dying

    This POSTbrief provides a brief overview of assisted dying, including ethical debate and stakeholder opinion. It examines how assisted dying functions within health services in countries where it is a legal option, focusing on jurisdictions where most data are available on outcomes: Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands, Oregon (United States), Switzerland and Victoria (Australia). It also covers evidence and expert opinion on key practical considerations that are raised in the context of assisted dying.

    Assisted dying
  • Palliative and end of life care

    Palliative and end of life care are increasingly in demand as people are living longer and with multiple long-term conditions. However, an estimated 100,000 people in the UK that could benefit from palliative care die without receiving it each year. There is substantial evidence that inequalities in access to palliative and end of life care relate to various sociodemographic factors. Experts have highlighted that access to palliative and end of life care may improve quality of life for patient and family and reduce symptom burden. This POSTnote summarises the key components of palliative and end of life care and recent changes in UK policy. It identifies inequalities and challenges to accessible provision. It also reviews evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the provision of care and outlines key trends.

    Palliative and end of life care
  • Prolonged Disorders of Consciousness

    Medical advances mean that increasing numbers of people survive physical injury, stroke, periods of low oxygenation and severe brain infections. Some, however, are left with substantially reduced consciousness. This paper discusses the medical, ethical and commissioning challenges associated with the care of patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states, and explains the impact of recent legal judgments.

    Prolonged Disorders of Consciousness