This POST note examines the biological basis of ageing, the potential to manipulate the ageing process and to use such knowledge to promote better health later in life.

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Biological ageing results from the accumulation of damage within cells, leading to a loss of function and, ultimately, cell death.  The underlying mechanisms of ageing are also risk factors in the onset of frailty, disability and long-term disease. This POSTnote examines the biological basis of ageing, the potential to manipulate the ageing process and to use such knowledge to promote better health later in life.

Acknowledgements

POSTnotes are based on literature reviews and interviews with
a range of stakeholders and are externally peer reviewed.
POST would like to thank interviewees and peer reviewers
for kindly giving up their time during the preparation

Dr Aoife Kidy (Alzheimer’s Society)
Dr Mathew Norton (Alzheimer’s Research UK)
Professor Wolf Reik (Babraham Institute)
Dr Jon Houseley (Babraham Institute)
Dame Linda Partridge (University College London)
Professor Lynne Cox (University of Oxford)
Catherine Joynson (Nuffield Council of Bioethics)
Professor Diana Kuh (University College London)
Professor Martin Knapp (London School of Economics)
Professor Mark Hanson (University of Southampton)
Gareth Giles (University of Southampton)
Dr Chandni Jacobs (University of Southampton)
Professor Thomas Von Zglinicki (Newcastle University)
Professor John Mathers (Newcastle University)
Professor Thomas Kirkwood (Newcastle University)
Dr João Pedro de Magalhães (Univesity of Liverpool)
Dr Alison Tedstone (Public Health England)

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