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Plastic packaging is widely used in the food sector but plastic waste in the environment is a growing consumer concern. This POSTnote outlines the main options for reducing packaging waste (removing, reusing, replacing and recycling plastics) and examines the potential to combine them into a coordinated waste strategy.

Acknowledgements
POSTnotes are based on literature reviews and interviews with a range of stakeholders and are externally peer reviewed. POST would like to thank interviewees and peer reviewers for kindly giving up their time during the preparation of this briefing, including:

• James Winpenny, Linda Crichton and Robert Vaughan DEFRA*
• Sanjay Patel and David Harding Brown, The Packaging Collective*
• Carole Taylor, The Local Authority Recycling Advisory Committee (LARAC)*
• Andy Rees, Welsh Government
• David Newman, Bio-based and biodegradable industries association (BBIA)*
• Lucy Frankel, Vegware*
• Professor Margaret Bates, University of Northampton*
• Professor Helen Hailes, University College London*
• Professor John Ward, University College London*
• Dr Teresa Domenech, University College London*
• Dr Sally Beken, Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN)
• Richard Kirkman and Nadiya Catel-Arutyunova, Veolia*
• Dr Adam Reed, SUEZ*
• Erik Lindroth, Tetra Pak*
• Helen Munday and David Bellamy, Food and Drink Federation (FDF)*
• Sian Sunderland and Frankie Gillard, A Plastic Planet*
• Patrick Mahon, WRAP
• Liz Goodwin, World Resources Institute (WRI)*
• Professor Michael Norton, European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC)*
• Professor Andrew Dove, University of Birmingham*
• Stuart Lendrum, Iceland
• Julieta Cuneo and Jacob Ainscough, Policy Connect*
• Hans van Bochove and Nick Brown, Coca-Cola European Partners*
• Dr Deborah Beck, Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures*
• Dr Thomas Webb, University of Sheffield*
• Dr Rukayya Muazu, University of Sheffield*
• Dr Sarah Greenwood, University of Sheffield*
• Benjamin Punchard, Mintel
• Rob Thompson and Ian Ferguson, The Co-op
• Martin Kersh, Foodservice Packaging Association (FPA)
• Mark Shaw, Parkside Flexibles*
• Kate Avgarska, Thorntons Budgens*
• Tom Pell, The Clean Kilo*
• Neil Whittal and Adrian Pratt, The Paper Cup Recovery and Recycling Group (PCRRG)
• Anthony Wilson, Food Standards Agency (FSA)
• Abigail Green, Anthony Avella and Glenn Fleetwood, UK Parliament Environment Team
• Richard Burnett, James Cropper
• Cecile Hourse, Terracycle*
• Dr Alvin Orbaek White, Swansea University*
• Adrian Haworth and Bronwen Jameson, Recycling Technologies*
• Jacob Hayler, Environmental Services Association (ESA)*
• Ian Jamie, Staeger Packaging*
• Adam Robinson and Will Mercer, Coveris*
• Andrew Sweetman, Futamura (UK)


Documents to download

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