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Employers are making increasing use of psychological tests for assessment and recruitment purposes. These tests can provide much useful information when used properly, but there are increasing concerns that this is not always the case. For instance, some uses of tests in recruitment procedures have been shown to be discriminatory, and there have been allegations that psychological tests have also played a part in selecting candidates for redundancy.

This report examines the scientific basis of the different types of psychological tests commonly used by employers, their strengths and weaknesses and the issues that arise


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