• 26 January 2021, 09:30 to 10:30 GMT
  • This closed briefing is open to parliamentarians and parliamentary staff.
  • We can extend invitations to attend to government officials and civil servants. If you belong to one of these groups please contact us at postevents@parliament.uk to discuss your attendance.
Contact POST to request an invitation

The national census for England and Wales will take place on 21 March 2021. The census is conducted every ten years and collects valuable and detailed information about every household. The data is used to shape policy, allocate resources, plan public services and monitor equality. For the first time, this will be a digital-first census, with targeted support and activities to maximise participation across all communities.

In this closed briefing, speakers from the Office for National Statistics will give an overview of the plans for the 2021 census, including its operation during the COVID-19 pandemic, and significant changes since 2011. Discussion will also focus on public engagement, data accessibility of census outputs and perspectives on the future of a decennial census in the digital age. Speakers from the House of Commons Library will reflect on the value of census data for parliamentary scrutiny and in providing research services, and how the needs of Parliament for social data are evolving.

Chair’s welcome

9:30

Lord Lipsey

Panel discussion

Cassie Barton – Library Clerk, Social and General Statistics Section, House of Commons Library

Iain Bell – Deputy National Statistician for Population and Public Policy, ONS

Nicola Tyson-Payne – Interim Director of Transformation, Population and Public Policy, ONS

Penny Young – House of Commons Librarian

Chair’s closing remarks

10:25

Close

10:30

Who can join

This briefing is open to parliamentarians, parliamentary staff, Government officials and public servant.

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